JOSEPH SHORE
   

BARITONE

"Sang so expertly that one flinched inwardly
at the implication that Salieri murdered Mozart.
THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

"Juan Pans, the originally scheduled 'Amonasro,' bowed out long
before rehearsals began. No problem. A young and remarkably talented baritone named Joseph Shore

proved ready, willing, and able to sing into the breach

...Shore brought vocal and dramatic thrust to Amonasro."
Martin Bernheimer
THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

 

"Shore's voice has a velvety quality of extraordinary beauty
which could place him with the finest baritones of the day."

TULSA DAILY WORLD



"Baritone Joseph Shore was superb as Salieri, his voice full and
flexible, his acting on a level rarely seen on the operatic stage."
NEWSDAY

"Baritone Joseph Shore’s magnificent voice makes him an imposing Rigoletto.

He was superb in getting across the awful dilemma of the clown who jests while his heart is breaking.

His duet with his daughter was the most touching moment of the evening."
THE IRISH TIMES

"The Rigoletto, Joseph Shore, is a fine dramatic baritone with ringing high A flats, and he was obviously well inside this role."

THE BELFAST TELEGRAPH

 

"I have had the good fortune to both employ and sing
with Joseph Shore over a period of many years. I have
always been a sincere admirer of his beautiful voice and
obviously superior grasp of vocal technique. Having
performed with him again recently, I can say that Joe
Shore is a world-class singer who really knows what he is
doing. He has not lost anything. In fact, he sings better
now! Having had the stimulating and thought-provoking
opportunity to read his treatise on the use of the human
voice, I am even more impressed by this man's
extraordinary gifts. Any conservatory or university would
be most fortunate to have him on staff."

JEROME HINES, Metropolitan Opera 

"To Joseph Shore, who gave me a better understanding of the male's high voice."

Jerome Hines, The Four Voices of Man, (Acknowledgments, p.xi)

 

JOSEPH SHORE has performed many of the greatest baritone roles with opera companies throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe, receiving critical acclaim for his portrayals of Rigoletto, Germont, Amonasro, Renato, and Falstaff, among the Verdi roles, as well as for Alfio, Tonio, Scarpia, Barnaba, Telramund, Pizarro, and Salieri.  Mr. Shore has performed with the Lyric Opera  of Chicago, the San Francisco Opera, the San Diego Opera, the Houston Grand Opera, the New Jersey State Opera, Tulsa Opera, Opera Omaha, the Arizona Opera, the Nevada Opera, the Toledo and Dayton Operas, the Lyric Opera of Dallas, the Fort Worth Opera, the Goldovsky Opera Theatre, the Chamber Opera Theatre of New York, New York Grand Opera, Opera Classics of New Jersey, the Chautauqua , Aspen, and Northern Ireland Festivals, the Edmonton Opera, The Canadian Broadcasting Company, The British Broadcasting Company, the Belfast Grand Opera, the Youngstown Symphony, the Savannah Symphony, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic, The Raleigh Symphony, and the Jerome Hines Opera Troupe.

    In the 1980’s he had some of his biggest successes as Salieri in the New York premiere and revival of Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera, Mozart and Salieri.  Also during the decade of the 80’s, Mr. Shore gave memorable performances of his Verdi roles in regional opera houses across America. In 1984 he made his European debut in Belfast, portraying the title role of Rigoletto, at the historic Belfast Grand Opera House in a series of performances broadcast by the BBC. In the decade of the 90’s, he added the roles of Barnaba, Scarpia, Renato, Schicchi, the title role of Boris Godounov (in the Rimsky-Korsakov orchestration), and Robert in Tchaikovsky’s opera, Iolanta,  a role which Galina Vishnevskaya personally selected for him.

    Mr. Shore continued to sing Verdi and dramatic baritone roles as well as oratorio and concerts until 2004.  Concert audiences often heard him perform rare material, like Mussorgsky’s Songs and Dances of Death, rare works by over-looked composers, like Riccardo Zandonai, Russian folkslieder, American songs and Gospel. 

    Today, in addition to his singing, Mr. Shore has become noted as a professional voice teacher. Indeed, Jerome Hines, in his new book, The Four Voices of Man, gives credit to “Joseph Shore who gave me a better understanding of the male’s high voice.”  Mr. Shore’s  published article in the 1995  National Association of Teachers of Singing Journal, entitled  “A Great Singer  on Great Singing, an in-depth interview with Bass Jerome Hines” concerning vocal training, technique and trends within singing, shows the blend of voice science and historic Bel Canto that have become the hall-mark of his work as a teacher. As a young artist, he performed with great stars like Jerome Hines, James McCracken, Lucine Amara, Carlo Cossutta, Ezio Flagello, Gilda Cruz-Romo, Frances Yeend, Lucia Evangelista, Sherrill Milnes, Paul Plishka, and many others, learning the art of singing by observing great singers.  When Mr. Shore joined the music faculty of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and later The University of British Columbia, he added to his empirical training, the insights gained in this century from voice science.  He gives workshops in America and Canada on voice science in voice training. Mr. Shore considers Jerome Hines his mentor in opera because of all the instruction he received from him during their work together, and because of the outstanding role model Mr. Hines provides as a person and a singer.

 

The great basso, Jerome Hines, had this to say about Joseph Shore:

“I have had the good fortune to both employ and sing with Joseph Shore over a period of many years. I have always been a sincere admirer of his beautiful voice and obviously superior grasp of vocal technique. Having performed with him again recently, I can say that Joe Shore is a world-class singer who really knows what he is doing. He has not lost anything. In fact, he sings better now!  Having had the stimulating and thought-provoking opportunity to read his treatise on the use of the human voice, I am even more impressed by this man’s extraordinary gifts.”  - Jerome Hines, Metropolitan Opera

 

Joseph Shore has won numerous awards, including the coveted Bruce Yarnell Memorial Award for Baritone, the WGN-Illinois Opera Guild National Award, and as a national winner of the Metropolitan Opera Auditions, the Gladys Axman-Taylor Memorial Award.

 

“Sang so expertly that one flinched inwardly at the implication that Salieri murdered Mozart.”  THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

 

“Juan Pons, the originally scheduled Amonasro, bowed out long before rehearsals began. No problem. A young and remarkably talented baritone named Joseph Shore proved ready, willing and able to sing into the breach…Shore brought vocal and dramatic thrust to Amonasro.”

MARTIN BERNHEIMER

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

 

“Shore’s voice has a velvety quality of extraordinary beauty that could place him with the finest baritones of the day.”

THE TULSA DAILY WORLD

 

“Baritone Joseph Shore was superb as Salieri, his voice full and flexible, his acting on a level rarely seen on the operatic stage.”

NEWSDAY

 

“Baritone Joseph Shore’s magnificent voice makes him an imposing Rigoletto. He was superb in getting across the awful dilemma of the clown who jests while his heart is breaking. His duet with his daughter was the most touching moment of the evening.”

THE IRISH TIMES

 

“The Rigoletto, Joseph Shore, is a fine dramatic baritone with ringing high A flats, and he was obviously well inside this role.”

 THE BELFAST TELEGRAPH

 

        

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Awards and Honors

International Winner (The US and Canada) of the METROPOLITAN OPERA AUDITIONS, NEW YORK, 1975

 

Winner of The Gladys Axman-Taylor Memorial Award from The Metropolitan Opera National Council, 1975

Performed in Gala Concerts at The Metropolitan Opera, 1975

Offered a contract by The Metropolitan Opera in July 1978

 

The National Winner of The WGN (Illinois Opera Guild) Auditions of the Air, 1976

Performed at The Lyric Opera of Chicago and operatic recitals on WGN     

National Radio

 

Winner of The Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation Artist's Grant, 1976 New York

International Winner (The US and Canada) of The Bruce Yarnell Memorial Award for Baritones and Basses, New York, 1981. (This is a mid-career award and the other applicants included leading baritones of The New York City and Metropolitan Opera.)

 

Created the role of "Salieri" in the New York Premiere of Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov's opera, Mozart and Salieri

 

In 1988, my career was evaluated by academic authorities as being more than the equivalent of a doctoral degree. (See letters in resume.)

 

In 1995, Dr. Thomas Cleveland, voice scientist, presented recordings of my work to The Voice Symposium founded by Dr. Wilbur Gould, as examples of great baritone singing.

 

In 1997, Jerome Hines of the Metropolitan Opera wrote his book on singing and dedicated it to me along with about thirty other people who had helped his singing in his career, people like, Bruno Walter, Ezio Pinza, Arturo Toscanini and Leonard Warren.

RADIO BROADCASTS

 

BBC Broadcast of Verdi's Rigoletto with me in the title role from The Belfast Grand Opera, The Northern Ireland Music Festival

National Public Radio Broadcast of Puccini's Tosca with The Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic

WGN Radio Broadcast of The Lyric Opera of Chicago (Puccini's La Fanciulla del West), in which I sang a role.

WGN Radio Chicago, Recital operatic broadcasts as National Winner of the WGN Illinois Opera Guild Auditions of the Air.

WQXR New York, operatic appearances; also broadcast of Menotti's The Old Maid and the Thief in which I sang the baritone role.

 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

Apprentice Artist at The Santa Fe Opera, 1974 and 1975
(classes in stage movement, fencing, musical coaching, vocal technical study,
understudy to International singers, performed roles in the main season and in apprentice productions)

Pupil of Cesare Bardelli (Metropolitan Opera baritone). New York, coaching in 20 baritone roles, technical voice study 1975-1980

Pupil of Andrew Field (The Cantica School of Voice, London) 1974,1975, technical vocal study

Coaching in New York with Alberta Masiello, The Metropolitan Opera, and with
most of the leading coaches in New York City. These coachings were from 1975 until 1988.

As a performer, I have learned by being a colleague on stage with some of the
greatest opera singers of The Second Golden Age of Singing: Jerome Hines, Cesare Bardelli, Frances Yeend, Marilyn Niska, Louis Quilico, Ezio Flagello, Sherrill Milnes, Paul Plishka, James McCracken, Lucine Amara, Gilda Cruz-Romo, and many more.

Since 1975 I have been a member of Jerome Hines' Opera Company and have learned from my association with him and the other artists in the company.

 

FORMAL EDUCATION:

 

Southwest Baptist University, Bolivar, Mo., Received Bachelor of Arts, 1970
The University of Tulsa School of Music, Masters work in voice and opera

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. Masters work in
divinity

The Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Kansas City, Mo. Masters work in divinity

The New York Department of Social Services, Training in Social Work

 

St. Vincent's Services for Children, Brooklyn, NY, Training in Social Work

 

VOICE TEACHING

 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1988-1990,
Full Time Lecturer in Voice. Duties included: studio voice
instruction for undergraduates and graduate students;

supervision of Masters candidates and theses; regular
performances in recitals, on and off campus, guest performing
with symphonies and opera companies, guest lecturing in vocal
pedagogy and song literature classes.

 

The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC 1990-1993.
Full time. Assistant Professor of Voice. Duties included all the
above with the addition of full-time teaching vocal pedagogy
and song literature courses. Also supervision of doctoral
students, doctoral theses, and doctoral programs.

Other activities associated with teaching include: ongoing
research in voice by interviews with great singers and voice
scientists, adjudication of competitions (District and State level
Metropolitan Opera Auditions), artistic consultant work for
artistic foundations.

 

Adjunct Professor of Voice, The University of Indiana at Indianapolis 2002 Studio voice work

 

Private Studio Work (1993 to currently): In Vancouver I am the
director of a large voice studio (about 35 to 40 students)
comprised of seasoned professionals, young professionals,
musical comedy and theatre specialists, pop singers, gospel and
jazz singers, and beginners. I also direct the Camerata
Singers, conduct two choirs and directed The Fellowship of
Christian Artists.

Publications:

"A Great Singer On Great Singing," The NATS Journal,
Jan/Feb. 1995

 

OPERATIC ROLES:

 

Alfio. Cavalleria Rusticana. Mascagni
Tonio, I Pagliacci. Leoncavallo
Germont, La Traviata. Verdi
Rigoletto, title role, Verdi
Renato. Ballo in Maschera. Verdi
Di Luna, II Trovafore. Verdi
Macbeth, title role, Verdi
Amonasro, Aida. Verdi
Falstaff, title role, Verdi
Don Carlo, La Forza Del Destino. Verdi
Rodrigo, Don Carlo, Verdi
lago, Otello. Verdi
Simon Boccanegra, title role, Verdi
Nabucco, title role, Verdi
Telramund, Lohengrin. Wagner
Pizarro, Fidelio. Beethoven
Salieri, Mozart and Salieri. Rimsky-Korsakov
Jack Rance, La Fanciulla Del West. Puccini
Scarpia, Tosca. Puccini
Barnaba. La Gioconda. Ponchielli

The Bear, (title role) Sir William Walton

PREMIERES:

New York premiere of Mozart and Salieri (Rimsky-Korsakov)

Created the role at Antonio Salieri for The Chamber Opera Theatre of New York,
1981, 1982 revival, 1985

Further Reviews

 

"Baritone Joseph Shore was superb as Salieri, his voice full and
flexible, his acting on a level rarely seen on the operatic stage."
NEWSDAY

 

The menacing Tonio of Joseph Shore is sung and acted splendidly.

THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC


Joseph Shore was the best all-round voice of the evening. He sang Alfio in CAV and Tonio in PAG doing quite well in both. His acting was believable, and his singing powerful, expressive and artistic. Good Show!
THE NEW JERSEY COURIER-NEWS

This Rigoletto is one of the triumphs of the company's history. Joseph Shore's Rigoletto is etched with enormous skill... A thoroughly believable and very musical performance.
THE ARIZONA DAILY STAR

 

Joseph Shore presents Salieri as a sort of Everyman turned bad, capable of arousing sympathy and self-recognition from the audience. He also sings the part beautifully, which doesn't hurt.
THE FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM

 

In the character of Macbeth Joseph Shore gives us a man who suffers genuinely as he is swept along by tides of greed and jealousy which he cannot fully understand. Shore is that rare Macbeth who almost forces us to pity him....Better yet is Shore's virile, powerful baritone. It seems to be an instrument under total control of its owner. He is able to modulate it with vivid emotion—grief, fury, fear, anything—without distorting the sense of the musical line. And it seems tireless. At the end of three hours of heavy use, it seemed as fresh and as powerful as it started out.
TUCSON CITIZEN

Baritone Joseph Shore is the main appeal of the Arizona Opera Company's
Macbeth...Shore sings a powerful title role, one that integrates Verdi's fluent vocal lines with the weak and pitiable character of Shakespeare's original tragedy...When Macbeth withdraws from his murdered King's chamber and holds the bloody knife aloft, it is a chilling thing indeed to hear Macbeth almost shudder the words, 'Now it is finished.' Shore milks it for all he can, faltering ever so slightly on the final notes—Shore has a dusky voice, one instrument from top to bottom, and with a gentle edge like a properly aged Scotch.

THE ARIZONA STAR

Joseph Shore's Macbeth was effectively interpreted, particularly in the mad sequences when he brought to his portrayal a tension that revealed him to be both a frightening tyrant and a frightened, haunted ruler, unable to stop shaking after committing the crime of murder for fear he too will be slaughtered. Shore is as much an actor as he is a singer. He is more animated on stage than any of the other singers and exhibits a sense of importance whenever he makes an entrance, in whatever mood. He makes an excellent Macbeth in stature and voice, and demonstrates a careful, considered understanding of the role. He has a rich, robust voice that fills the hall with an open, masculine sound that at one point in Act IV had more gusto to it than the combined voices of a dozen castle guards.

THE PHOENIX GAZETTE

 

Particularly effective in drawing his character down to the finest details, vocally and otherwise, was Shore as Germont. His declamation of 'Pura siccome un angelo,' Germont's plea to Violetta, was a highlight of the production as was his performance of 'Di Provenza il Mar.'

THE ARIZONA DAILY STAR

The other principle role of Germont, Alfredo's father, was skillfully sung by baritone Joseph Shore whose vocal equipment is mature and as smooth as molten rock.  

TUCSON CITIZEN

 

The only excellent performance came from baritone Joseph Shore as the elder Germont. His rich, warm voice projected well and his 'Di Provenza il Mar was enjoyable.

THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

 

The two dark, malignant characters, Anne Esch as Ortud and Joseph Shore as Frederick, both were good. Shore, in his Act II lament about how robbers won't even look up at him, was a pool of astonishingly black, angry despair.
TUCSON CITIZEN

One of the strongest points of the production is the consistent level of excellence displayed by the cast. In addition to Neill, Cook, and Esch—all new comers to Arizona Opera, there was old-timer Shore of Macbeth, Traviata, and Rigoletto, in fine form as Telramund.

THE ARIZONA DAILY STAR

 

Baritone Joseph Shore's magnificent voice makes him an imposing Rigoletto. He was superb in getting across the awful dilemma of the clown who jests while his heart is breaking, and his duet with his daughter, 'Piangi Fanciulla,' was the most touching moment of the evening.

THE IRISH TIMES

The Rigoletto, Joseph Shore, is a fine dramatic baritone with ringing high A flats, and he was obviously well inside this role. This was his European debut.
THE BELFAST TELEGRAPH

 

Joseph Shore as Rigoletto is exceptional for a young singer beginning a career. He plays the role with a greater physical warp and deformity than does Kostas Paskalis of the other cast, and he was much alive, giving more variety and color to his passages in the rather slow first act. He sings with a fine fullness, resonance, and power and was convincingly mature as the grieving father in the second act. Shore's performance here should do much to send him on his way.  THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE

  

 

...the elegant toned Joseph Shore, a stuffy yet human Germont pere.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

 

As the elder Germont, Joseph Shore revealed a rich pleasant voice admirably suited to the role and a stage presence that was a decided plus.
             THE UNION

 

Shore, who has a good sized baritone of good quality and considerable stage presence, scored something of a triumph as Germont with the opening night audience.
THE SACRAMENTO BEE

 

Joseph Shore, in the role of Alfredo's father, Georges Germont, also made a strong impression. Both dramatically and vocally he is a stirring figure. His portrayal of the person who was the catalyst in the tragedy was powerful. Most impressive of all was his singing. A strongly modulated voice and a penchant for ensemble singing made his appearance memorable.

OMAHA WORLD HERALD

 

Joseph Shore has a ringing kind of baritone that was just right. And he sustained very well as Ping.

THE TOLEDO BLADE

Joseph Shore, a singer with a genuinely attractive baritone, gave an excellent account of the roles of both the Mandarin and Ping.

DAYTON DAILY NEWS

 

Rigoletto was visually grand,  dramatically believable, and emotionally moving, musically...It  was a cast that filled Rigoletto with spontaneity, freshness, and that all important ingredient, life!... Joseph Shore's Rigoletto was powerful, sometimes gut- wrenching

THE JOURNAL HERALD

 

Joseph Shore was delightfully bumpkinish and vocally he was totally satisfying.

  THE TULSA TRIBUNE
                                                  

 

Joseph Shore is a professional artist of tremendous promise...Shore's voice has a wide range. It is rich in the lower tones and sure in the upper register. At times it has a velvety quality of extraordinary beauty which could place him with the finest baritones of the day.

THE TULSA DAILY WORLD

Joseph Shore thrilled an expectant audience with his sumptuous baritone voice.
THE TULSA TRIBUNE

 

The saga of the boorish suitor (Joseph Shore as Sir William Walton's THE BEAR) was done with all the vocal, dramatic, and orchestral resources one could wish for... When opera is done this way it is worth any number of MET average night performances.

THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Joseph Shore as Antonio Salieri is unquestionably a baritone with a future. His voice and phrasing gave Rimsky Korsakov's composition a flair of subdued glamour and drama.

WVOX RADIO WESTCHESTER

 

 

Joseph Shore's Salieri provided the evening's finest singing, and one hopes to hear much more of him in the future.

BYRON BELT, NEWHOUSE NEWSPAPERS


 

Particularly effective in drawing his character down to the finest details, vocally and otherwise, was Shore as Germont. His declamation of 'Pura siccome un angelo,' Germont's plea to Violetta, was a highlight of the production as was his performance of 'Di Provenza il Mar.'

THE ARIZONA DAILY STAR

The other principle role of Germont, Alfredo 's father, was skillfully sung by baritone Joseph Shore whose vocal equipment is mature and as smooth as molten rock.
TUCSON CITIZEN

The only excellent performance came from baritone Joseph Shore as the elder Germont. His rich, warm voice projected well and his 'Di Provenza il Mar was enjoyable.

THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

 

The two dark, malignant characters, Anne Esch as Ortud and Joseph Shore as Frederick, both were good. Shore, in his Act II lament about how robbers won't even look up at him, was a pool of astonishingly black, angry despair.
TUCSON CITIZEN

 

 

One of the strongest points of the production is the consistent level of excellence displayed by the cast. In addition to Neill, Cook, and Esch—all new comers to Arizona Opera, there was old-timer Shore of Macbeth, Traviata, and Rigoletto, in fine form as Telramund.

THE ARIZONA DAILY STAR

 

The Rigoletto, Joseph Shore, is a fine dramatic baritone with ringing high A flats, and he was obviously well inside this role. This was his European debut.
THE BELFAST TELEGRAPH

 THE CRITICS RAVE ABOUT CHAMBER OPERA THEATRE OF NEW YORK'S PRODUCTION OF RIMSKY-KORSAKOV'S 'MOZART AND SALIERI" WITH JOSEPH SHORE AS SALIERI.

"Chamber Opera Theatre's performance and production were thoroughly
admirable, including the staging by Thaddeus Motyka.  Both operas
(sung clearly in good English translations) were cast with splendid
singing actors, including Ron Gentry as a Mozart not far removed from
Tim Curry and Joseph Shore as a Salieri on an Ian McKellen level.
Indeed when Shore broke down while reading the opening of Mozart's
Requiem after giving his rival poison, it was a moving moment of truth
comparable to anything in AMADEUS." Bill Zakariasen, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

•Baritone Joseph Shore was superb as Salieri, his voice full and flexible,
his acting on a level rarely seen on the operatic stage."
Peter Goodman, NEWSDAY

•MOZART AMD SALIERI is almost a monologue for Salieri and it was handled
beautifully here, both musically and dramatically, by Joseph Shore,
the 1981 winner of the Bruce Yarnell Memorial Award for Baritones."

Glenne Currie,UNITED PRESS international

"Joseph Shore...gave a fully engrossing, richly characterful portrayal,
breaking into very convincing desolation at the climactic moment
when Mozart's Requiem wells  up from the orchestra."

Jack Heimenz, MUSICAL AMERICA

"The one-act, two role opera is Rimsky-Korsakov's setting of Pushkin's dramatic poem in which Salieri, not Mozart, is the leading figure, a role both commandingly and sensitively dominated at the opening performance last night by baritone Joseph Shore."

Dave Spangler, THE BERGEN RECORD

"The dominant role is that of Salieri, with Joseph Shore giving a really
awesome portrayal of the court musician who can never fathom or hope
to gain one spark of Mozart's genius.

Jennie Schulman, BACKSTAGE

"JJoseph Shore excels in his role of Salieri.  He is as fine an actor as he
is a singer, and both talents combine in an altogether convincing and
moving performance...one would want to attend the production as much
for the theatrical value of their performance as for any other reason."
Louis Morra, WKCR RADIO

'Joseph Shore's Salieri provided the evening’s finest singing and one hopes to hear much more of him in the future."

Byron Belt, NEWHOUSE NEWSPAPERS

'The only voice I can single out for distinction is the sonorous baritone of Joseph Shore."         Noah Tree, AFTER DARK

 

"...an uncluttered, serious and moving account of Rimsky-Korsakov's
one act MOZART AND SALIERI... Baritone Joseph Shore sang and acted a powerfully tragic Salieri."      

  Leighton Kerner, THE village VOICE

 

"The singers in Mozart and Salieri were Ron Gentry, as the young genius, and Joseph Shore, as his jealous rival.  They fulfilled their assignments so expertly that one flinched inwardly at the implication that Salieri murdered Mozart....."

Allen Hughes, THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

"Mozart and Salieri was so highly acclaimed when Chamber Opera performed it last season, that they decided to bring it back with the original principals, Joseph Shore as Salieri and Ron Gentry as Mozart. Both were perfectly cast to the extent where you feel no one will ever be equal to their flawless characterizations.  Shore, in particular, possesses a dramatic baritone voice of limitless range.  In contrast, Gentry displays a clear, crisp tenor which suits ideally.  Both gentlemen conveyed convincing historical portraits of the rival Maestri/Composers."

Jennie Schulman, BACKSTAGE

".... a very satisfying work .... Good acting blended well with good singing; the characters came alive.  It was a wonderful production."
FESTA, The First Guide to the Performing Arts in the U.S.A.

 

".... Chamber Opera Theater of New York  ... focuses on rarely done works.  All of its productions are meticulously rehearsed and minutely detailed.  They have to be:  in this intimate setting, everything appears close up ... the strong baritone voice of Joseph Shore (Salieri) and the silvery tenor of Ron Gentry (Mozart) complemented each other nicely ,.. The success of such groups is heartening...."

Annalyn Swan, NEWSWEEK

 

"C Chamber Opera Theater of New York revived its hit production of  Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov's Mozart and Salieri at the Marymount Manhattan Theater Wednesday night ... Mozart and Salieri’s  expert production and performance (once again starring Ron Gentry and Joseph Shore in the leads) were fully up to last season's high musical and dramatic standards."

Bill Zakariasen, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

 

 

Joseph Shore

Voice Teacher

206-4505 Grange St.

Burnaby, BC V5H 1P7

Canada

(604) 677-6750

Email: maestroshore@shaw.ca

Web site: www.josephshore.com